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Thread: REXERS ROAD TESTS

  1. #21
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    Re: REXERS ROAD TESTS


    Captain Blue :: "Whitey is not the Messiah: he's a very naughty boy!"
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  2. #22
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    Re: REXERS ROAD TESTS

    Since it's tricky evaluating an unfamiliar machine in a monsoon, I'm not surprised the thread's gone to sleep recently. However, I'm due to get my leg over a Morini Corsaro in the near future and will report back on this highly rated 1200 V Twin. May do a back to back with another Italian vee......... Anyway, keep em rolling in chaps

  3. #23
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    Re: REXERS ROAD TESTS

    Update on Corsaro Veloce v A.N. Other - now that we've got a 72 hour window - AKA summer - before normal service is resumed, the plan is to get this one done sharpish. If anyone else manages to have a bit of fun on the side remember to add your findings to this thread. (PS: album of the summer: JETHRO TULL - AQUALUNG. No contest.)

  4. #24
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    Re: REXERS ROAD TESTS

    have recently owned a 888,zx9r and tl1000rw and a friend of mine let me have a go on his tuono i feel that after riding those bikes i always feel more at home and more comfortable on the zrx than the others.i have a stretch of road near where i live that i travel every day and i get more enjoyment by riding the rex than i have riding the others so draw your own conclusions.
    let the rex be with you.

  5. #25
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    Re: REXERS ROAD TESTS

    hey i've got that album

  6. #26
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    Lightbulb MORINI CORSARO VELOCE v SPEED TRIP (updated)

    Much cheaper than a Brutale - or any MV for that matter; way more individual than a Ducati or an Aprilia (customers can actually ring the factory to discuss personal requirements - try that elsewhere); and the best kept secret in motorcycling (although one or two Rexers are old enough to know the heritage.....). Those were some of the comments made by a colleague when I mentioned the subject of this test.

    The Veloce is Morini's piece de resistance: the 90 deg V twin (water cooled) as used in the Corsaro 1200 with an extra helping of grunt - abetted by Marzocchi USDs, Brembos and standard Termignoni zorst. (Some of these goodies - but not the Termis - come as standard on the base model, itself a highly rated machine; the difference in the Veloce is the higher state of tune.) Even with the baffles in they'll hear you coming round the block, and as you open her up that soundtrack is worth the ride on its own - it's that pleasurable. (Three Cross Motorcycles, the UK importer who supplied the bike, told me that the one customer who went for baffles out came back within 48 hours: car alarms, windows rattling etc etc - so the baffles went straight back in.) But the sound of the thing is merely an introduction to the whole experience, underscored by the whooping and yelling pilot. Certain bikes have the reputation of smearing a grin all over your face - this was how the riding experience was described to me - and the Veloce delivered. In spades.

    I rode on a mix of A, B and unclassifieds while - astoundingly - the sun beat down through an azure sky. This particular machine was the self same beast ridden & rated so highly by Bike (July 07), although I didn't know that at the time. Two things stand out immediately - particularly if you've just got off a 4 pot machine: I rode the 50 odd miles to Three Cross on my S and thus had direct points of comparison. And they are: the engine braking, and torque delivery that really does pull on your arms. Hard. The pronounced engine braking is an incredibly useful parameter, characteristic of big Vs. Early on the ride I entered a couple of bends slower than planned: it really is like having an additional anchor facility. Not that the four pot Brembos need much assistance - but once you've adjusted your ride technique, you realise you have an additional weapon in the armoury. The torque is roughly equivalent to a nicely tuned Rex - on paper (80 lbs sq ft on the standard Corsaro, surely more on the Veloce), but - and you have to believe this - its delivery feels startlingly more pronounced: assisted by spot on road gearing. Peak torque is achieved at 6500 revs ie in the right part of the range for road use. 135 bhp is available, peaking at 8500. Again, just about right - and good for 150 mph, although inevitably I was aware of the old neck getting a proper work over when you hit three figures, which was achieved without any fuss; suggesting that the bike would be more happily capable of long distance Motorway burns than the rider. But that is in the nature of the beast.

    Handling wise, the Veloce was like a half way point between the Rex and the Trip I rode later: more manoeverable and planted than the former, less quick steering than the latter. The 1440 mm wheelbase puts it bang in the middle for bikes in this class - shorter than a Z thou, longer than the trip: same as the S4R Monster, but with more ride height. The dry weight is 190kgs - again, right in the middle of the class. Cornering was neutral and the bike felt light and flickable, although not quite to the extent of the Trip.

    Compared to other big Vs I've ridden recently - the Tuono 07 and SV thou 06 - the Morini feels much more torquey and generally smoother all round. Bimbling down an unclassified lane on a neutral throttle at 40 there was no hint of low revs hesitancy, or - unlike many RSVs - snatchiness. The handling is at least as sure as the Tuono and more so than the SV thou. All suspension parameters are fully adjustable and the seating position is neutral, with plenty of leg room. The clutch is light, and the box shifts firmly but accurately.

    Lookswise the trellis and general styling fits together well; I've seen more aesthetically pleasing details around the headstock area and more attention to detail, but then I've also seen more expensive motorcycles. (See the JPEG to get an overall idea.) I tend not to favour underseat zorsts; a tuner's nghtmare and pillion arse roaster to boot, adding weight at seat hight. But as the Veloce bosts the Termis as standard, further tuning (if at all necessary) needn't involve a system replacement. Updated mapping is available as required.

    I like to have a direct point of comparison when I do a test ride, and get straight onto a competitor in the same class. Enter - take two - The Trip. When I last tested the 1050 (against the Tuono) I had a nagging feeling that I'd done the bike a disservice. On that occasion the Trip had the worst of the conditions: more traffic, mixed weather. Here was the chance to find out if I'd underestimated Hinckley's finest. But - as on the previous occasion with the Tuono - I'd again just got off a superb Italian twin, thinking nothing could top it.......... TBC
    Last edited by PALESAINT; 26th August 2007 at 06:51 PM. Reason: spec correction

  7. #27
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    Smile VELOCE v TRIP pt2

    A triple - the ideal compromise between torque laden twins and rev hungry fours? In the Triumph guise, many people think that they've got it spot on.
    The Speed Trip doesn't have the arm wrenching thrust of the Veloce, and lacks the wailing top end of a Jap sporty four. Instead you have a superb balance between both experiences. With the Trip, you're always in the right gear - naturally.

    But the real bonus is the confidence it gives to average riders like me. Suddenly you're maintaining higher corner speeds on all roads, with the power always on tap as you come out. The Speed Trip isn't an out an out high speed machine - it's more fun than that. And the idea that this is some nutty, full on naked for stunt riders is irrelevant: it's a bike that liberates a normal rider's potential.

    As I've said before, in the straight line stakes other bikes will outgun it - the pleasure of revving the triple lump notwithstanding. And I found the front end just a bit twitchy when going for broke on a straight - when all is said and done, this isn't the bike for long haul stuff. That's not what its about. It's a bit like a more real world version of a supermoto.

    In conclusion, I don't think the Triumph is as flexible as either the Tuono or the Veloce and both outgun it, although the Triumph is no slouch. Where it has the edge is in the twisties - good though those other bikes are in the handling department. As ever, it comes down to application: what you're gonna be using it for. Despite the exotic vibes, for regular use I'd go for the Corsaro (ideally in Veloce spec.) For longer stuff - the Tuono. For back road blasts - the Trip.

    Money wise I've a suspicion that when the 675 Street Trip hits the market, used 1050 prices will fall - you already see clean 05 Trips for 5k. Sure, the 1050 has more muscle but in a weird way I reckon both bikes have very similar applications, and the market will reflect that. The standard Tuono is the best value for money: 6700 new - same as my local K dealer is asking for his last new Rex; he's holding out for top dollar on it. A used low miles Veloce is around the same bucks as a new Trip: 7500.

    You pays your money etc - or (like most of us) you dream on.........

  8. #28
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    Re: REXERS ROAD TESTS

    Quote Originally Posted by wingnut View Post
    hey i've got that album
    Ahhh another child of the 60's. . . man . . .

  9. #29
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    Re: REXERS ROAD TESTS

    I'm an and honestly can't remember a time of such diversity and quality in the market as there is now - except for strokers (sadly), due to emissions strangulation. So get yer arse over a non rex down the local emporium and tell us about it here. That way we don't have to rely on the bike press etc - although reasonably balanced these days hype is still a problem. Just a tad

    I'm going to soil a Street Trip (hopefully next week) - but is the 07 CBR 600 the wunderkind we've been told? Or the 07 Hornet for that matter? How about the sexy and expensive Ducati Superbastard? And lets have more off road reviews if poss. Old bikes too: if you've had a spin on a mate's bike, let us know. Don't matter if its already been reviewed here, nothing wrong with a 2nd opinion.

  10. #30
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    STREET TRIP

    As was the case with the Ducati 1098 and Daytona 675 (whose lump is donated to the Street Trip, with altered camshaft and valve timing for increased low rev torque), I was very much concious of the tide of media hype surrounding the launch of Hinckley's latest offering; the detritus is everywhere. The 1098 & 675 are good bikes, but - particularly in the case of the 1098 - the hysterical response which greeted them seems even more ludicrous now than it did at the time. It is undeniable that this is an importrant bike for Triumph, as their representative in the lucrative (and therefore competitive) general middle weight class. Could the Street Trip possibly live up to the exalted status already foisted on it?

    The short answer: no. Yes, the handling is sharp. Yes, the engine is a peach and howls rewardingly in off beat trip stylee as the revs rise. Yes, 5300 is a cheap OTR price for a brand new model with such capabilities. But everything else seems to me to be part compromise: of the Daytona, or the Speed Trip. And not in a good way.

    The naked street style of the SPEED TRIP, SUPERDUKE & TUONO - a class the little Trip aspires to, not least in visual terms - tends to feature a highish seat and wide bars: for plenty of manoeverability around town and in the twisties, environments where they're most at home. But the Street Trip - heavily styled on Speed Trip principles around a Daytona frame - compromises the feel of the bigger bike by lowering the saddle, thus altering the its relationship with the bars. In other words, they've shafted the ergonomics. A lower seat on a bike like this makes no sense - we're still talking short wheelbase naked here, much more Speed Trip than Monster, for example, but the Street Trip falls between the two. It's a compromise intended to increase sales potential: high seats turn off shorter people as well as those who like a more traditional lower ride. But on this type of bike it just feels all wrong, neither fish nor fowl. Interestingly, this isn't a detail you pick up on until you assume the position: the bike may look like the Speed Triple - but appearances can be very deceptive.

    Secondly, the extreme light weight, combined with the overall geometry and our iffy road surfaces, encouraged the machine I rode to dance about a fair bit: no wonder the launch was on top notch Italian blacktop. Nothing threatening: just a reminder that lightness and sharp handling are not best served by our deteriorating network. Suspension adjustment is limited - rear preload - and tweaking would only compromise a pretty good standard set up without solving the problem. Why compromise the design in order to accomodate Blighty's creaking infrastructure? Why compromise the price by adding fully adjustable suspension parameters when everyone agrees what's there is pretty damn good? Why indeed: but the irony is that a UK purchaser will be making a compromise if he opts to go for the baby Trip. Surprisingly, over the ton the bike's front end generally feels a tad more stable than its big brother's: the latter likes more weight up front at speed. But below that, the big bike feels more planted without loosing out on overall handling ability. It should be remembered that both machines set a very high standard as far as cornering is concerned, and the Street Trip's skittish tendency was never alarming. But combined with that motor I could see the bike being a handfull for the inexperienced or unwary, since it begs to crack on at every opportunity.

    Thirdly - and most annoyingly - opening off a neutral throttle at low speed resulted in a very jerky response, not dissimilar to that experienced on older RSVs for example, but more prevalent. Which could make crossing a big city an even more frustrating experience than usual, aided and abetted by a very poor steering lock.

    Finally the brakes. Two piston sliding calipers are superb, a reminder that radials are only necessary as a fashion accessory. But even here there was a problem: I had to execute an emergency stop. Nothing really special - I'd anticipated the tractor might pull out, and therefore started shedding speed early - but still, an emergency stop. The front did the job, but there was a lot of judder - pneumatic drill style. (In fairness this could have been a one off - I didn't have the time to subsequently investigate the cause, and since this was a test bike, albeit with only 700 miles on the clock, it could have suffered some abuse. I simply don't know.)

    However. Despite all this, the Street Trip has one asset which - for certain discerning customers - will be a huge plus. It is the closest thing you can buy to a hot new mid cc stroker: think RD 350 and, amazingly, you won't be that far off. The lack of weight and the addictive power band type rush - plus the inclination to skip about a bit - are all there: even the howling Daytona lump suggests an echo of a decent stroker soundtrack. Somehow the Street Trip definitely has bluehaze DNA in its make up. Seriously, anyone think of buying a two stroke 'project' should try one of these things first. You'll save time and money without loosing out on the fun. In any way.

    It could be argued that - if you're in the market - the 675 is worth a punt because it's such a stonking deal. But remember - this will be reflected in second hand values over the next couple of years. And there's no getting away from the fact that the bike feels a bit cheap: in order to take on the Japanese at their own middle weight game, components are sourced from all over the world and the whole is built - inevitably - to a (low) price. And the fact remains that for around 5300 - or considerably less - there are some very viable used alternatives.

    If you love the lump but want focus, go for the Daytona 675: 5.5k will put you in the frame. If you want a grunty street bike which - on our roads - outhandles the Street Trip, you can pick up a decent second hand Speed Trip for 5k. (Despite the tractable lump and reasonable supply of torque, the baby trip misses out on the instant grin factor that big bruv readily posesses, courtesy of the shove on tap from the word go. Unsurprisingly, you have to ride the little 'un more like a sports 600 to put a smile under the helmet.) It's just a shame the bigger bike's unique appearance (love or loathe) aint gonna be quite so unique any more: I'd be a bit pissed off as a Speed Triple owner on seeing its identity compromised by a stable upstart. Or consider another option: for less than 2k, you could pick up a naked SV. Heighten the ride, widen the bars, add big bore kit and open pipes. Hey Presto! A light, naked corner loving beastie to raise the dead for three grand tops: that's second bike money.

    The Street Trip is still a good bike. But only time will tell if it is more than that: right now, I'm not convinced. Despite what you'll read, there are always plenty of options. Remember them.
    Last edited by PALESAINT; 26th August 2007 at 08:26 PM. Reason: clarity (hopefully).

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