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Thread: REXERS ROAD TESTS

  1. #111
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    the Netherlands
    Posts
    5,225

    Re: REXERS ROAD TESTS

    ships get called 'she'
    I bet torpedoes don't

  2. #112
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    North Yorkshire
    Posts
    440

    Tuono V4

    Had the opportunity to take one of these for a spin yesterday so thought I'd share with the group:

    Had a briefing off the shop owner that took almost as long as the test drive, this thing has so many gadgets that I'm surprised it hasn't appeared on the show. Bits to remember are wheelie control, traction control and the quickshifter.

    First impressions, heading through town: Damn tall seat height, lumpy as hell below 3 grand and "where the chuff is the front wheel?" Felt like the latter was somewhere between my knees this thing is so short.

    Second impressions, heading out of town: at 3 grand it all smooths out and you get a huge shove up the arse. For comparison, the Rex is the quickest thing I've ridden up to now and I immediately noticed the extra 50 ponies (as you'd expect). Seat is hard as nails, everything is very firm, but surefooted with a feeling of real build quality.

    Third impressions, open road: 3 grand, 4 grand, holy shit where's the front wheel? Oh there it is 3 foot off the ground.... and there it remained for the rest of the test. Apart from when I was braking when the back wheel wanted to do the same. Really struggled to get myself feeling part of the bike (which I'm sure would change with some familiarity). The seat feels incredibly wide and the tank hard to grip with my knees. Cornering was effortless, but odd somehow. It is about a foot shorter than the Rex, I kept expecting it to start tank slapping, but it didn't, even with the front wheel lifting out of corners at stupid speeds.

    Time to calm down a bit as there had been some resurfacing done with deep gravel on the road. It is possible to bimble, provided you keep it off tickover where it feels really agricultural. I don't know if traction control kicked in on the gravel, but there were no scary moments.

    Then for a test of the quickshifter. Found a nice long stretch of straight road, dialed in more wheelie control ( as briefed) and nailed the throttle in first. Instant wheelie, but now only about a foot, kick up a gear while WFO (wound fully open) a nonosecond dip in the exhaust note and we're into second, totally seamless acceleration right up to the point where I ran out of bottle. Pretty sure the front wheel was off the ground the whole time, but I couldn't really tell for the idiot laughing out loud in my helmet. I always thought these things were a gimick and maybe they are, but a hugely addictive one.

    Summing up, I never considered trading in the Rex, but was hugely impressed with the Tuono. The V4 sounds awesome, build quality fantastic, the toys worked superbly but I just couldn't live with such a beast. Getting back on the Rex, felt like climbing into an armchair on which the springs have gone, but it's a favourite armchair and I like it better.

    Ade.
    "Be Happy for this moment... this moment is your life"

  3. #113
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Bridport, DORSET
    Posts
    9,015

    Re: REXERS ROAD TESTS

    Thought I might as well update the thread.

    Spent an afternoon on the Tuono V4. Review here

  4. #114
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Moved, Now near Roger's Trout Fishery
    Posts
    4,836

    Re: REXERS ROAD TESTS

    Triumph Tiger 1050.

    After running around on the Vfr800 for most of the year and putting around 7k on the top of the 6k it had I've come to the conclusion it's not for me. Nothing wrong with the bike as such ( it's not you, it's me ) nice handling, nice engine albeit you need to rev it. I find it a tad small for me ,@ 6'3" and 16stone I'm exactly svelte like, and it doesn't excite me that much. Where I love my Rex for its grunt and road presence, I would look back at it whilst going back indoors after a blat, I just don't do that with the viffer.

    So, I'm on the look out for a newish bike to cover a number of roles. It needs to fit me, and have good pillion capabilities, I want to be able to fit hard luggage as I want to do more euro touring, solo and 2 up. When I get there and at home I want to wazz about without all the luggage and not have a behemoth of a machine to wield about.

    So, to the point of the post, one of my shortlist is a Triumph Tiger 1050. I popped down to J S Gedge in Pevensey Bay, Eastbourne today to test ride one. It was an SE model so came with panniers, hand guards, 12v power socket, centre stand and also had a gel seat. First impressions were good, it's tall and comfortable for me, bars are nice and wide and the riding position was quite similar to my rex though perhaps a bit more upright. Jo came along too, and found that she sat closer to me than on the vfr, but not uncomfortably so. Footrest weren't too high, better than the rex ones.
    Motor is really nice, creamy power from low down but I found the throttle a bit snatchy at first. Once I got more used to it it was better. Clutch was nice and light. Took it easy at first, roads were still a bit damp, I had Jo on the back and Triumph are really good about their test rides so I had plenty of time. We went up to Beachy Head, it is a twisty road up and down the other side, out to Newhaven, then Lewes, looped round through Ringmer and back down the A22 so took in a good range of roads. Great view of the roads, nice wide bars but i found the mirrors to close to me, but they didn't blur.
    Piss easy overtakes, even when in top. Brakes are top notch too ( has abs but didn't trigger it). Gearbox was clunky though and needed a firm boot to down change sometimes so might need bedding in as the demo was brand new. Screen offers good wind protection and didn't buffet Jo either ( unlike the vfr, and I put that down to the taller screen fitted and the fact the seat is longer the gap between us makes the wind more turbulent.
    The rex has the better engine (well my tuned one does, I've forgotten what a standard 11 feels like) the triumph has better brakes, better suspension.
    Panniers on the triumph are very small especially the right hand one as it has the silencer behind it. Speaking of which, that's the first thing I'd bin. Its too big and too quiet.
    All in all, I thought it to be a great bike but not without some minor faults.
    Now I need to try the other shortlists.
    Blackbird and zzr14 though zzr14 may be too much money for me, both to buy and rear tyres. Open to other contender suggestions fitting my remit
    Last edited by yox; 13th November 2011 at 07:24 PM.

    Team Fat Bastard
    RBLR1000 Iron Butt UK Member 2012
    .................................................
    I'm not a complete idiot.............................some bits are missing

  5. #115
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    9

    Re: REXERS ROAD TESTS

    + 1 on that

  6. #116
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Bridport, DORSET
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    Re: REXERS ROAD TESTS

    Quote Originally Posted by yox View Post
    Blackbird and zzr14 though zzr14 may be too much money for me, both to buy and rear tyres. Open to other contender suggestions fitting my remit
    You're after a do it all, the sort of bike that would automatically have been a sports tourer, but these days the big trailies come into it.

    Obviously, it depends on how much dosh you have to spend.

    If you're flush, the one which everyone seems to love is the Multistrada. I know someone who has had the 1200 touring for a year and loves it with no mechanical or electrical dramas. That testerreta is some lump, based on the 1198. It really does everything well bar proper off road. Plus you get switchable ABS and TC thrown in. I'd look for a nearly new one.

    The new ZZR14 2012 is more grunty, longer stroke, again with switchable electronics.

    Less money: You can get a used Triumph 1050 sprint ST pretty cheap these days, due a major upgrade soon. If you want something more funky and robust, the 1100 GS boxers are proper tough, more so than the 1150 and 1200 apparently. If you found a low miles one, it will see you through to the pension. Plus you can accessorise (lights, luggage) till the cows come home.
    A really interesting and neglected trailie is the Caponord, that an RSV with dropped gearing and decent long travel suspension. Only the new m/strada is more powerful in the big trailie league. They are brilliant fun.

    Even less:
    ZZR 12s are cheap these days and I reckon they were a much better bike than the 11. Blackbirds the same, but you'll get better value with the Kwak.

  7. #117
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Manky Keynes.. AKA Little Botswana
    Posts
    340

    Re: REXERS ROAD TESTS

    I always wanted to own a Ducati 748SPS. It HAD to be a yellow one, genuine mileage complete with the serial number plaque on the head stock. I looked for years for the right one.
    Then, I chanced upon one for sale in Huddersfield (at the time i lived in Staffordshire) so it was not a million miles away. So, picked up the phone, made arrangements to go and take a sneaky peaky at it, armed with some English Dollars as a deposit and my licence and insurance for a test ride.

    Saturday came.. I was like a dog with two dicks, on viagra! Jumped in the car, threw the semi awake Mrs in the back and let her sleep until we arrived in the distant Northern plains of Huddersfield. Found the dealers easily avec Sat Nav.

    Walked into the shop, there she was.
    Gleaming.
    Spotless.
    Yellow.

    Swear to god i had a fucking hard on as the guy came over and i introduced myself. The necessities were done. Licence, deposit laid down, insurance details.
    Armed with the keys he took it outside. Alarm deactivated, petrol on. First shove of the button and off she purred. The titanium con rods banging away in Vee formation.
    Helmet on.
    Boots.
    Boots.
    Jacket.
    Gloves.

    Mrs just looked over disinterested (glad to say we are divorced now and my new 'er indoors at least takes some notice of my needs!!)

    Leg over the seat. Hands on bars. Feeling the vibe lump purring away under my ass I couldn't wait to see how she handled.

    Then it happened.. the sun disappeared behind some pending grey clouds. Spots not the ground turned to more spots, turning to large decking splashes. TREE Fooking MENDOUS!! my first time on a Duke and it pisses down.

    So, tentatively I took off down the road. To traffic lights. Checked mirrors. Clear. Ahead.. clear dual carriageway, no cars in front. I had to do it... red turned to green, first selected, looked behind... stalled! What a twat I felt. All in view of the bike shop owner and my ex.
    Fired her up, set off and gave her some berries. Fuck the rush was superb. Smooth, linear, my heart punning so loud i am sure i could hear it in my helmet over the Termi's!

    Sublime handling.
    Tremendous brakes.
    Smooth power delivery.

    Then it happened.. a corner looming, then an island. Corner taken carefully, then the island... round. Clear. Checked mirrors... pulled over. Side road entered and sat there adjusting the mirrors as I wasn't too happy with the view.
    Went to commence my three point turn. HA!! I wish.. lock to lock was piss poor, so piss poor i got off the bike and dragged the back end round.

    I rode her for about twenty minutes, couldn't open her up as the roads were now soaking. She ran like a dream HOWEVER due to an earlier bike accident the low speeds meant my weight was on my healed bones and it hurt like hell when i got off.

    In was gutted. TOTALLY gutted. My dream bike turned out to be a nightmare. Although still one of THE sexiest bikes ever produced, i can't ride her how she is intended, the low bars, small seating position, cramped cockpit and piss poor steering lock to lock really put me off.

    I still yearn for one.
    I may even still buy one..... or a 916, or a 996 (yeah i wish).

    Since then, i've had muscle bikes... Bandits, and now my beloved Rex 11.

    A dream, shattered.
    Gutted!
    98% of all Harleys ever sold are still on the road. The other 2% made it home.

    Finally, you’ll never see a motorcycle parked in front of a psychologist’s office. Riding a bike is therapy in itself.

  8. #118
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    the Netherlands
    Posts
    5,225

    KTM Superduke and duke 690

    They had the orange days here so I figured I would have a look. Decided to take a spin on the duke 690, my mate took the superduke, we could switch halfway

    Superduke:
    First inpressions: Nice dimensions, good body position, rock-hard seat (actually foam so soft you sit directly on the seat plate)

    sounds good, fairly light. engine is fairly smooth, not too thumpy. throttle precision is HORRIBLY. especially below 4k revs the thing just knows on and off, very hard to do a roundabout let alone a fast corner. suspension is very good, frame a bit wobbly. not nearly as fast as I had expected. no power wheelies in second gear.


    duke 690:
    First inpressions: very small, vertical seating position, wide bars. seat is good, legroom good even for my stilts

    riding off reaveals the single thumping below you, though not as bad as most big singles. again bad throttle precision on low and high revs, but because it's not as powerfull it's easier to overcome. at speeds over 60 your head wants to fall off. steering is good at low speeds, higher speeds make it wobble. works better on dirt roads than a supeduke :P totally unusable as a daily ride, might be fun if you live near twisties. thing rattled from the engine in an unhealthy way, wound be concerned about reliability

    all in all nice looking bikes, but they should really hget the injection working before putting them on the market, takes out all the fun.
    ships get called 'she'
    I bet torpedoes don't

  9. #119
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Bridport, DORSET
    Posts
    9,015

    GSXR 1000 05/6 (and 03 750).

    GSXR 1000 05/6

    So went for a run today with Clive from the workshop down the road, he was on his 06 thou and I was on the 750 (03). At half time we swapped. The thou had a full yosh system, mine has standard headers and a Pipewerx can.

    Everyone knows that this particular Gix is the one, which why it was the starting point for BMW's S thou. The 750 (a fraction lighter and 130 brake on the dyno) felt like a revvy stroker in comparison. The thou is like a turbine (this one puts out 165 brake), it's still one of the great bikes, pulls at all revs and for that reason you do have to remember not to be heavy handed on the way out of corners otherwise that arse starts twitching. The thou's original suspension felt more composed than the 750s, although we both agreed the smaller bike handled at least as well - both bikes are just planted.

    The astonishing thing is how comfortable they both are. GSXRs always had a reputation for being roomy, and they've always fitted me better than other sports bikes. You'd have to be an unusual shape not to feel at home immediately... Despite busy roads on a sunny Sat, we got the chance to open up and the thou is like warp drive, a cartoon of speed. Clive was a decent club racer with a good few lap record to his name and he was predictably faster than me on both bikes, getting a lot out of the 750. What was interesting was that on both he hardly moved, just completely still and relaxed and seriously quick.

    The effortless speed is the down side of the equation. I glanced down at the thous speedo at one point and was taken aback by what I saw. Although both machines bimble without any fuss - unlike virtually all Italian sportsbikes and KTMs - if you buy one, you will end up seeing twice the national speed limit with no bother whatsoever. And you feel far more in control than on many bikes going 50mph slower, hence the potential legal hazard. Nevertheless, it was a fantastic experience and if you haven't ridden one I'd urge you to give it a try. You don't associate sportsbikes with grunt, but that's what the thou does.

    The main thing the two had in common was the on rails sensation when cornering. Arguably the 750 is more licence friendly since you have to decide to nail it, whereas the thou's power is always instantly on tap. You can pick up a Y series 750 (00 - 03) for under 2500 grand. The 03/04 thou is hardly less sensational than its successor and can be found for 3k. The 05/06 classic will set you back around 4. If you can't buy one, beg steal or borrow a ride. It's a box that needs ticking.
    Last edited by PALESAINT; 7th October 2012 at 11:34 PM.

  10. #120
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Bridport, DORSET
    Posts
    9,015

    Re: GSXR 1000 05/6 (and 03 750).

    LINK TO BIKERGLORY ROAD TESTS

    www.bikerglory.com/category/reviews/

    Yam MT 07, 09, Honda VFR 800 2014, BMW R1200R vs NINE T, R 1200 GS 2014, Norton 961, Honda NC 700 etc etc......

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